Vie.gg partners with SpeedGaming to sponsor and host even more tournaments

Vie.gg partners with SpeedGaming to sponsor and host even more tournaments

It’s another day and we have another speedrun racing announcement on the block! SpeedGaming was created by legendary speedrunner “Feasel” in 2015 as a way to give back to the speedrunning community, and since then has been host to a plethora of speedrun races on Twitch, and an ever-growing catalog of VODs on YouTube. Outside of GamesDoneQuick, the twice-annual live speedrun charity event, SpeedGaming is the largest and most consistent speedrunning group on Twitch.

SpeedGaming has been home to every important speedrun game across its six collective English Twitch channels, as well as a handful of broadcasts in other languages. SpeedGaming is truly a global speedrun authority, boasting nearly 13 million views on their main channel. We’re looking to help SpeedGaming continue to support the speedrunning community by sponsoring a pair of tournaments that they’ll be hosting to close out 2018.

Weekdays starting on November 26, we’ll be sponsoring and hosting SpeedGaming’s A Link To The Past / Super Metroid Combo Randomizer tournament races (say that three times fast…) on www.vie.gg/pools. Additionally, we’ll be sponsoring and hosting every match for the legendary Super Mario World tournament which will be played on weekends, starting on November 30.

You’ll be able to find a handful of additional matches and tournaments on the site too. You can catch the action across all six Twitch channels, as well as additional broadcasts in Spanish, French, and German.

We’re ready to see all of these incredibly hard-working speedrunners and racers take their craft to the next level and we spoke with Feasel to get his thoughts on the partnership:

SpeedGaming is proud to be partnering with Vie.gg to bring our viewers a new way of enjoying their favorite races. We look forward to a long collaboration that will help expand speedrunning and its communities, as well as grow the Vie.gg brand as a pioneer in this up-and-coming sport.

Races will start appearing on the Pools section of Vie.gg as soon as brackets are created on SpeedGaming. Check back a few days before the races begin.

We hope that you give a look at these speedrun races and see the similarities to your favorite esports. Maybe in a few years the two groups will be sitting at the same table. And we can’t wait.

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Global Speedrun Association Partners with Vie.gg

Global Speedrun Association Partners with Vie.gg

Today we are happy to announce an industry first as we expand Vie.gg’s offerings from esports-exclusive betting to include betting on speedrunning races. If you’ve been on Twitch at any time in the start of a new year or during the summer, you’ve surely seen the monumental GamesDoneQuick marathons, which display, well, games done quickly.

Speedrunning, as it’s called, was thrust into the mainstream a few times a year to great applause. But the people beating these games in absurdly fast times do more than a couple events per year. They are practicing techniques, routing new ways to beat games, and oftentimes, racing each other.

Each speedrunner plays the game on their own setup, starting at the same time as their competitor; the player to beat the game or finish their goal is the winner! That’s where organizations like Global Speedrun Association (GSA) come in.

Global Speedrun Association hosts and administrates races on a broad variety of speedrun games, most notably Super Mario 64 and Super Mario Odyssey. Across their three Twitch channels, they have seen rapid growth as they look to push speedrunning from a twice-yearly event to a truly sustainable path. Much like how the esports scene was small and unestablished only 10 years ago, groups like GSA help raise the standard of production quality and push speedrunning forward.

We love speedrunners and we love what GSA is doing. And that’s why we want to partner with them.

Rounding out the end of 2018, esports betting platform Vie.gg will be sponsoring a prize pool for three tournaments that are run by GSA: Super Metroid: Any-%, Super Mario Odyssey: Any-%, and Super Mario 64: 70-Star. The tournaments will be run with their usual style and production value, with Vie.gg providing a platform for speedrunning fans to bet on the races.

We’ll be adding these tournaments to our pool betting platform, and updating them constantly as the tournaments progress. We know that esports fans and even professional players love speedrunners and we hope to help bridge the gap even closer.

So get your fill of esports betting now! Check back once brackets are ready (a couple days before November 23rd) and start getting your bets in on your favorite runners in Odyssey, Super Metroid, and Mario 64. We’ll be ready for you.

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clawz: “I doubt that any sizeable organization will ever be interested in Quake”

clawz: “I doubt that any sizeable organization will ever be interested in Quake”

Two times QuakeCon Duel champion Nikita “clawz” Marchinsky talks about winning, Nyx, sponsors in Quake and just waiting for the much anticipated CTF game mode.

The young Belarusian came out victorious for the second year in a row in the year’s most stacked tournament. QuakeCon this year again as well attracted the best players in the world.

Since then, the twenty-year-old player joined Myztro Gaming and is preparing for the future tournaments.

Vie: You overcame everyone at QuakeCon in a very convincing manner. Were there any matches that actually made you sweat?

clawz: Before the game against Garpy I was feeling really nervous. I knew I had no right to lose that match and that got to my head. I also got pretty close to it in a game against DaHang. I was leading 2:0 in rounds and was just feeling this gloom of things to come.

Vie: Are you getting used to the US? You have been to three QuakeCons already.

clawz: I didn’t really get a chance to properly explore USA. But every place is good in its own way.

Vie: Let’s talk about your Nyx. The aggressive approach to attack your opponent straight out of invisibility. Was that something planned or did it just happen for you?

clawz: Nyx is a very underrated champion. Her skill-cap is really high and I like her a lot. I like the things you can do with her, even considering her limited resources. I play her on almost every map. She’s especially strong on DM6 and Ruins, but you have to be able to hit a lot.

Vie: And which weapons do you like? Or should say which one, rail or LG?

clawz: LG (lightning gun, ed.note). It’s a strong weapon from a psychological perspective. It’s good in both attack and defense, and most importantly — it’s stable.

Vie: And your favorite game mode?

clawz: I’m just waiting for CTF. Playing with four people results are always more stable. And it’s really that much more fun to play with more players.

Vie: What’s the situation with sponsors in Quake right now? You must be getting a lot of attention, being a two-time world champion.

clawz: I doubt that any sizeable organization will ever be interested in Quake. The deal that I’m being offered all the time — with 10-20% of my prize winnings being taken away — from small organizations just isn’t right. Because Quake doesn’t get that many viewers there’s very little we have to offer each other.

Vie: Do you ever watch your own replays?

clawz: I don’t. And never did, actually.

Vie: What is the change Quake needs the most right now?

clawz: The game itself. Some game mode that would finally attract people. I really wouldn’t mind seeing a Quake Battle Royale game.

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Esports betting is here to stay

Esports betting is here to stay

Despite having stumbled, flopped and downright failed on multiple occasions the betting industry is still very much involved with the heart of esports. The industry is desperate to find the secret key for success and multiple companies are trying their hardest to win over players.

The problem comes however with scandals such as the wave of match fixing currently threatening the integrity of esports. That combined with the skin betting sites and other sites showing little to no care for the actual players is causing a rift between players, fans, and the betting sites.

One company, however, is pushing the boundaries of what is currently on offer within esports betting and is trying to develop a closer relationship between esports and betting, in a similar way to conventional sports.

Vie.GG is trying to develop a more ethical and fair option, what they’re doing isn’t new to the betting industry but shockingly enough the system hasn’t made its way to the esports betting side.

The system is simple in concept — rather than a player betting against the company, they are betting against other players (like a private pool bet between two people, otherwise known as an exchange). This may not seem like a drastic change but it essentially means that companies using this model don’t care about the outcome of the individual bets, they skim a small amount from each bet and the rest goes straight to the player who wins the bet.

In this system, sites such as Vie.GG don’t even set the odds or amounts, these are all left up to the players and their knowledge of the games they bet on. This makes it much easier for players to get a fair bet and more importantly with the right amount of knowledge in your chosen esport your potential to win is far greater than that of a traditional esports betting site.

This combined with the company’s approach to working with esports teams and creators directly all adds up to why players are leaving conventional betting sites and making the switch to this new (for esports betting) system.

It seems that the future for esports is very closely tied to the future of esports betting, with many of the top teams now being sponsored by esports betting sites. The test of time will now be to see how esports betting sites like Vie.gg shape the future and create a fairer and more competitive betting system.

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Battlerite Royale is about ready to take on the world

Battlerite Royale is about ready to take on the world

During the many announcements here in the Europe’s largest video game convention, it was easy to overlook the one about the highly anticipated Battlerite Royale.

Gamescom 2018 so far has seen many breathtaking announcements, playable versions of long-awaited games, as well as plenty of content for video game fans to consume. Meanwhile, a small indie developer from Sweden, Stunlock Studios, revealed the details for their take on the current battle royale craze, called Battlerite Royale.

As the name implies, the game will take place in the same universe as the popular multiplayer online battle arena made by the developer. In a familiar battle royale fashion, the game will feature Battlerite characters being dropped into a large map, gathering resources, and fighting until there’s only one left standing.

In the announcement, the developer revealed that Battlerite Royale won’t be a playable mode in their highly-successful arena brawler game, but a standalone title. Even more than that, unlike its free-to-play predecessor, Battlerite Royale will have a price tag of $19.99 USD. And even though the game will be released in less than a month, the team behind the games are certain it will not affect their previous title, “The community has always been and will always be important to us,” game developer said in a statement. “Since last year, we’ve been working on new modes and trying to discover different ways of enjoying Battlerite’s signature combat system.”

Releasing the game as a standalone title will allow Stunlock Studios to focus on the further development of both titles, leaving extra room for both improvement and creativity to explore new ways of making their games even better. “The development of Battlerite Royale has been a fresh injection of creativity and an opportunity for us to try out new and crazy things,” Katey Parr, brand manager at Stunlock Studios explained. “When we prototyped Royale, it did not take long until we realized that it had a lot of potential. Later in development, it became obvious that sharing the same balance and philosophy as Arena restricted the possibilities within Royale.”

“As a game studio, we have a responsibility to our players, but we also have a responsibility to our team to allow ourselves to evolve and to explore new ideas,” Parr said. “For us, this was the choice between creating a mediocre game mode or creating a game with true potential and the freedom to grow.”

Upon the Early Access release this September, the game will have a price tag of $19.99 USD, however will offer a 50% discount to Battlerite Champion Pack owners, as well as exclusive mounts for all the Battlerite players.

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Korean government will build three new esports stadiums

Korean government will build three new esports stadiums

In an effort to bring esports even closer to mainstream recognition, the Korean government announces plans to build three more esports stadiums as well as a dedicated referee training facility.

The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism announced the project to build up to three new esports facilities in Korea by 2020. A dedicated tournament area, a broadcasting relay facility and a production studio are all in the plans, according to the official announcement. In addition, the Ministry expects to discuss the expansion of the existing sports facilities in order to make them more suitable to include esports.

Other mid-to-long-term plans include a dedicated referee training organ and a specialized agency to nurture human resources needed for the continuous growth of the esports industry. “We plan to design the facility in a way that it can utilize various aspects of esports tournaments as well as cultural performances and tourism programs,” an official of the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism told the press.

This is in line with the plan to expand esports to the region included in the “e-Sports promotion mid-to-long term plan” announced by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism back in December 2014. Since then, there have been several esports stadiums built in Korea in 2016 for a total of 306.4 billion won ($274 million USD). In order to lessen the costs, the ministry plans to improve and expand the existing esports and sports arenas.

Currently, the Ministry of Strategy and Finance considers the budget for the project in question.

The plans for the dedicated referee training facility might prove to be even more vital for the future growth of the industry. It is implied that it will become the cornerstone element that will allow esports to register as a member of the Korea Sports Association. Currently, the Daejeon Metropolitan City Athletic Association is the only sports association in Korea that accepts esports.

The proposal by the Ministry is in line with esports being selected as a model sport for the Jakarta-Palembang Asian Games and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) considering entering esports in the Olympic Games. “As esports become a regular sport, the impact on the gaming and sports industries will be even greater,” said a Ministry of Culture and Tourism official.

According to the announcement, the exact details of the project will be revealed later this month.

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