Right after the final game of the European Masters concluded, we grabbed Matúš “Neon” Jakubčík for a quick chat.

Even though Jakubčík’s Millenium came short of making it to the LAN finals, it was a strong performance overall for the French team. They overcame their opposition in the group stage without losing a single game, including easy victories against the Nordic champions Team Atlantis and ESL Premiership champs Misfits Academy.

Their first loss of the tournament came in the deciding match in the knockout stage against the major underdog Illuminar Gaming. Millenium became the second team to be upset by the Polish team, following Spain’s Movistar Riders. Mateusz “Kikis” Szkudlarek and his team did not stop there, as they managed to overcome Millenium’s rivals in the French league — GamersOrigin.

We sat down with Millenium’s young AD Carry for a blitz interview about his experience in the European Masters, losing against the underdogs, and his plans for the future.

Vie: You breezed through your group in a very convincing fashion. What were your expectations ahead of the group stage?

Neon: All of us expected and hoped to make it to the offline event, unfortunately, we couldn’t make it.

Vie: Which team would you say looked the strongest overall?

Neon: MAD Lions definitely looked very strong and I really expected for them to win the whole thing, the only team in top 4 I didn’t expect is Illuminar but they clearly proved me wrong.

Vie: EUM so far showcased a lot of new, young talents. Who you’d say are the most likely ones to move up to LCS soon?

Neon: Selfmademan and Nemesis [both MAD Lions].

Vie: How well would you say the top EU Masters teams would fair against LCS level teams?

Neon: I still think the gap is pretty huge, even though some national teams would probably be able to compete against the lowest EU LCS teams.

Vie: You came into this tournament as one of the favorites to qualify for the LAN finals, but you came short of achieving that. What were your goals ahead of the tournament?

Neon: We mostly wanted to beat GamersOrigin, so that we could prove that we are the best French team. And after that, put up a good fight in finals

Vie: Your journey through EUM was a bit of a wild ride — your group stage went as expected, but playoffs was a massive let-down. What happened there?

Neon: Smart preparations from our opponents left us in a really tough spot and caught us off guard, also our ingame performance was really shaky.

Vie: What’s your impression of the Polish Illuminar? 

Neon: If there’s a team to upset it’s probably Illuminar. As far as I know, Polish people on LAN events can be really overwhelming and tough to play against.

Vie: You really showed up for your team this tournament and established yourself as one of the best up-and-coming ADC’s. But which teams were the hardest for you to lane against?

Neon: Probably Illuminar, due to the matchups I was playing, but I don’t think anyone in the European Masters would have been too huge of a problem for me.

Vie: What did you think of the EU Masters in general? 

Neon: I think the tournament was really well done and very beneficial for all the young and new players looking to showcase themselves. The only thing that I’d maybe change is not making the group matches best-of-one.

Vie: You are still very young. What are your plans for the future? How big of a part will League play in it?

Neon: I’m still in school but after I’m done with it I plan on focusing full-time on League of Legends.

Neon’s Millenium finished 8th in the European Masters Spring Split, taking home € 8,000.

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