The newest addition to the Natus Vincere PUBG squad, Dmitry “Recrent” Osintsev, told how he came to esports and why he chose Battle Royale from a Korean developer.

Natus Vincere are one of the favorites in the European Pro League — PUBG’s $1 million dollar league — which is set to start next week. NaVi will face the likes of Team Liquid, FaZe Clan and others for a chance to become the first ever World Champions in PLAYERUNKNOWN’S BATTLEGROUNDS.

Dmitry “Recrent” Osintsev talked about the upcoming league, how he got into PUBG, the new map Vikendi and why he quit Overwatch.

You used to play CS: GO and Overwatch. Why did you abandon these disciplines and chose PUBG?

I did not try to play CS: GO competitively. I played at the amateur level, and the game got old. After that, I tried myself in Overwatch. They even called me to some organizations, but at that time I refused: I wanted to get into another team — something better (laughs). I had higher requirements. If they called me to a good team, I would have agreed to go. But, probably, I was not good enough for this.

What was the reason for moving to PUBG?

I had a team, or rather a mix. After the tournament, we broke up, because the captain decided to take a break from Overwatch, and no one wanted to play without him. I did not see any prospects in Overwatch and decided to try PUBG.

At that time it was very popular. The first time I tried it in May 2017. PUBG was on all the streams, everyone was playing it. I tried, played two games and then requested a refund because I was stuck in textures and died from the zone. I really did not like it. In fact, the main reason was that I had a weak computer then, and it didn’t run PUBG that well. I really missed the FPS, which kept around 40-50. It was impossible to play, although I already had a monitor at 144 Hz. Two months later, I bought PUBG for the second time (laughs) and then I started playing tight.

Do you play any other games besides PUBG? Maybe you follow other esports disciplines, watch tournament broadcasts?

I don’t play anything else. I only watch Natus Vincere on CS: GO. Watching videos on YouTube, Zeus blogs and so on. I am interested in the life of this team.

No single player games?

Not really. I haven’t played any single player games for a long time. Right now I’m waiting for Metro Exodus. I think I want to play it.

When did you understand that you want to connect your life with games?

I also wanted to break into the professional stage in CS:GO, but did not know how to do it. I spent little time on the game. Probably, when I played Overwatch, then I already understood that I wanted to connect my life with esports. I did not like to study as an economist. From the first semester, I didn’t like it when I entered university (laughs). But I dropped out only in the third year.

How did your parents react to the fact that you quit your studies at the university for the sake of your esports career? Do they support you, watch your streams?

Now, yes. My father watches all the tournaments in which I participate. In general, they are interested, I tell them a lot of things. Parents know what is happening. But at first, when I just left the university, they naturally reacted extremely negatively to this.

Everybody knows that optimization suffers in PUBG. At times, FPS drops even on top-end systems, and on medium and low-end PCs it’s generally dark. Does the low frame rate hinder the skill of the player?

I think it interferes, and very much. I’ll tell you by example. I played on a rather weak hardware for a year — I had a processor like i5 4460 and a GTX 970 video card. At some moments, the FPS could sink to 15. I only updated my computer in June-July 2018, that is, for a year I played on bad PC, and this greatly hindered the development of my skill.

I think PUBG Corp. is trying to optimize, but for technical reasons they don’t succeed. I read some blog from the developers, maybe it was a video where they say that it’s difficult for them to branch from what they originally had. I do not know what the problem is. But when they try to correct one mistake, they get new ones. Because of this, it is difficult to optimize the game.

You have played for TORNADO ENERGY for almost a year. Why did you leave the team?

I just received an offer from NaVi and I thought that in such a composition, in which I was called, I could achieve greater success than in the previous team. Because for the year of the game we, in fact, did not achieve any high results in tournaments.

Are you satisfied with the results in the composition of NaVi? Is it a pleasure to play in this team?

I like everything. The first week, maybe even two, after the announcement, we played badly. We performed well on the OGN Super League and after that the game began to improve. There have been few tournaments lately, and now we are preparing for the European league.

Do you think the team relationship should be that of co-workers or should it be like a second family?

I think the second option. Just friendly relations, in parentheses “family”, as you said. It seems to me that such a team can achieve more.

In Dota 2, CS: GO and LoL, the position of the coach appeared quite long ago. In PUBG you need it?

I think we do. Or, at least, would not hurt. A coach can help the team. I think in the next six months or a year the teams in PUBG will come to this. The Chinese had a coach six months ago.

In a recent interview, you said that the PEL format is “not bad” for you. Do you like such a system more or are the usual LAN tournaments better?

To begin with, in PUBG — everyone knows this — there is a significant element of the randomness. And a large distance can eliminate the influence of any random events to the maximum and reveal the real winner already. The distance of 300 games, which will be at PEL, I think, is able to determine which team is really the strongest. But it is not clear how this format will be interesting to the viewer.

Tell me how the team will prepare for the PEL? Do you have a bootcamp?

Bootcamp is planned directly at the venue. We will most likely arrive a week before the start of the league and play in those conditions.

It turns out that PEL will be your first major LAN tournament in your esports career?

I played on the LAN in Norway, but it’s hard to call it big. I am a calm person in this regard. I think that I will feel comfortable.

What can you say about your opponents? Who do you think will make you the most competitive?

It is hard to say. Almost all the teams had roster changes, and it is not clear who will perform. Plus the points system will change a lot. Everyone is used to the fact that kills play a small role, and points for places are the greatest, but now the picture may be quite different. Meta can change a lot.

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