The young Ukrainian player made waves in the FaceIT Pro League playing against the world’s best players. His performance there landed him a spot in Team Spirit.

Since joining his first professional team, the 21-year-old player secured the first place at the St. Petersburg Cybersport Festival “Defender”, finished second at StarLadder & ImbaTV Invitational Chongqing 2018 and ESEA Season 27: Global Challenge, among other results. Team Spirit also successfully qualified for the FACEIT Major: London 2018, where they finished 17-19th.

Victor “somedieyoung” Orudzhev talked about becoming a professional player and his hopes for 2019.

Let’s start with the fact that you won the European Qualifier for StarSeries i-League S7. What do you remember the most from that qualifier? Which team in particular left the most vivid memory? 

Team Vitality. We couldn’t beat them in our latest official games. We defeated them in practice, but they are a very uncomfortable opponent. They have some really skilled guys who perform on a good level. Roughly speaking, we improved our aim before that match, thought our tactics through, and relied more on communication. You can say that they were our principal rivals who we had to beat. We won the final, and it felt great. We will attend such a big event, and everything is good for us.  

What do you think about the format of that qualifier? Don’t you think that it was too long?

Actually, there are a lot of online qualifiers like that one. They may last for two months, even three in some cases. Some of them are really lengthy, but it doesn’t affect us in any way. 

What kind of format do you prefer: short qualifiers for a few days or those like we had for StarSeries? 

When you play a lot of matches in a time period of two or three days, you get tired. If qualifiers are lengthy, you have more time to prepare for your opponents. Also, you play better because of that, as you are in a good shape when you are in a situation like that. 

You are one of the few players from CIS region who qualified to the FPL. Tell us about your way to this league. Was it your defined goal to make it to the FPL?

I’ve already talked a lot about this topic. I was the first player from CIS who qualified to the FPL. Then, after that, new guys showed up. At that moment, it was my goal to get there, so I could play with the best players, rank up in the ladder and, actually, find a good team. I’ve played a lot in the FPL-C qualifier, and as a result, I qualified to the main division. 

What was your priority back then: to grind your way through the FPL or to find a professional team?

Honestly, my goal was to find a professional team through the FPL. Back then, we were playing in different teams in parallel with the qualifiers to the FPL. At one point, we were going to play in a qualifier to an event. I informed my teammates that I decided to participate in the FPL qualifier instead of that. They tried to change my mind, but I refused. In the same day, I made it to the FPL. 

A short time ago, CS:GO received a new update which changed a model of the distribution to Free-to-Play and presented the Battle Royale mode. Let’s begin with BR: have you tried it out? If you have, what are your impressions? In which way, from your perspective, it might affect the growth of the game in general?

It’s an interesting mode, but it’s really casual. Speaking about me, as I’m a pro player, it’s easy for me to win every match in this mode. There, I can do more than 10 kills and so on. It’s boring. But for casual players, I believe, it’s more interesting. It brings new content into the game. That’s why I think it’s a good thing. If the devs update it, fix all the bugs, it will be great.

But don’t you think that Danger Zone came out being in quite a “raw” state? 

Yes, but as I said before, it has to be further developed. Let’s even bring PUBG into discussion. It had a lot of different bugs when it was released. Probably, the early version of PUBG was better [than Danger Zone], but still, it also had to be improved no matter what.

As we know, CS:GO is free now. In your opinion, is it good or bad for the game?

In theory, as far as I know, there are more cheaters now. It’s easy to understand that because the game is free, there are a lot of new accounts which use cheats. It’s bad. [Valve] need to update their anticheat, so there will be more bans and less cheaters. 

In fact, Free-to-Play is always great for a casual user who just wants to test the game. Such players can stay in the game after trying it out. That’s a plus, I think.

When was the last time you played the Valve’s matchmaking? If you did, how was it? 

I actually launched it recently, maybe a week ago. It seems to be normal. When I play the matchmaking, I always have like more than 40 kills, and I don’t see any cheaters. In the Prime MM, at least.

Who would you highlight from the list of participants for the next CIS Minor? Which teams will be your main rivals?  

Nemiga are playing great CS at the moment. Basically, Nemiga and AVANGAR are the strongest teams out there.

Alright, who will make it to the Major alongside with you?

It’s hard to think like that. Actually, all the teams are on the same level. It’s hard to say. 

What kind of goals do you have in front of you for 2019?

In terms of goals for my team, I hope that we will have a decent result at the Major. After that, we have to get a good placement in Shanghai [StarSeries i-League S7], so we could enter the top-15 of the HLTV rankings at the beginning of 2019. If we establish ourselves, we can go even higher by small but confident steps. 

Individually, I will be improving my performance, just like I’m actually doing it now, and try to be better. I want to be among top-20 players in 2019. It would be great.

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