After wins against Winstrike, Vega Squadron, and Team Spirit, DreamEaters caught everyone’s attention in the CIS region. It was their time to shine at the WePlay! Forge of Masters LAN finals, and after the event, team captain Svyatoslav “svyat” Dovbakh talked about the experience.

DreamEaters had a strong start in the online group stage. Convincing victories against Vega Squadron and Team Spirit quickly got them attention from the other teams. They were still very young and raw, but the potential was there. Even more than that, as the Russian team continued getting wins against more achieved teams.

Svyatoslav “svyat” Dovbakh and his team did enough to qualify for the LAN finals in Kiev, Ukraine, but there their luck ran out. Team’s veteran Vladislav “Krad” Kravchenko faced with visa issues was unable to attend the event. A rare chance for DreamEaters to prove themselves took a big hit.

In the end, a Natus Vincere veteran Sergey “starix” Ischuk acted as a stand-in for the team, but it was not enough. DreamEaters lost in both of their games, 0-2 against AVANGAR and 0-2 against Vega Squadron. DreamEaters took fourth place and $2,000 dollars in prize money.

Your team has become a real highlight of the WePlay League group stage. Did you expect such a result?

Not to say that we expected it, but we understood that we are capable of it. The main goal was to show ourselves and play at the maximum — it happened sometimes, sometimes it didn’t, but the main thing was that we went to the next stage.

Can you comment on the victory over Vega Squadron?

In the match against Vega on inferno, we started to defend and in the first buy-rounds, we were given control of the banana quite easily. Due to this, we always understood at what point the opponent would come out and met them there.

Thus, we gained a significant advantage in the score and economy, and this made it possible not to do eco-rounds, when the “swing” began at the end of the side, and then to add pressure in the attack.

What came into your victory over Team Spirit?

Against Spirit, we also played inferno, but started offensively and dominated the entire side — we read the opponent well and went to the point, we could only play the post-plant situation in comfortable conditions for us, which we did.

During the game, someone of them burned down the computer and they changed it for half an hour, that probably ruined it for them, but we were already leading with a very significant margin and most likely would have won anyway.

And then you faced a much more experienced Winstrike.

The match against Winstrike was decisive for us and for them, so the pressure was slightly stronger than in the previous ones — it was decided who would get the 4th slot on the LAN. It was dust2, we started for defense and played just awful — bad positioning, bad decisions, bad exchanges.

Due to some crazy retakes, we managed to take a few rounds, especially the one with a score of 1-5, where speed4k entered the gate at plant B and crawled to the car, killing n0rb3r7, who was hiding there. Then we got a couple more rounds with the help of two AWP’s, and that was already enough to combine complete our plan.

In the second half, we carried out well-rounded openings, and then implemented them. And in the end, we did not lose a single round.

Do you think other teams underestimated you?

I doubt that our rivals underestimated us because it would be very unprofessional on their part. Especially in the group stage, where each game is super important and decides whether you will get to go to the LAN. So I consider every victory earned, and every defeat deserved.

At the same time, you lost to your former team — pro100. Why? The fact is that your old teammates knew you better than others?

We had a definite plan against pro100, but we failed to implement it, including due to the change of roles the day before. I think the fact that their players know me better had no effect on the course of the game. We completely failed the defense and because of this we lost the match, but the conclusions were made.

At the LAN finals you played with Starix, not Krad. How much does this affect your gameplay?

Any substitution weakens the team and forces you to use fewer strats and rely more on individual skill, play on communication, etc. Starix is ​​a good and experienced player and it was very interesting to play with him in Kiev, but the very fact of replacement diminished our ambitions for this tournament.

I think that made our main goal to be gaining experience when playing on LAN, rather than winning.

Who did you see as your rivals at the WePlay finals?

There were no rivals — but the number one team there clearly were AVANGAR, which means we had to prepare for them. Online, we lost to them with a score of 4-16, and both of them took the pistol, but in our opinion, the score was not at all in the game.

There were a lot of moments where we could play a little better and turn it over, so I would really like a second attempt. But on the LAN we had to play with a substitute and as such a rematch couldn’t happen as such, unfortunately.

CIS teams are historically very quick to swap rosters when things become hard. What helps you to stick together as a team?

Well, let’s start with the fact that we gathered in late December. Rather, I came 4 months ago, and when the team changes the lineup — it already becomes a new team. And during this time, we have very good results — two seasons QIWI, OGA Counter PIT, the tournament from Tricolor, passed on the WePlay LAN, went to the playoffs of the LootBet S2 tournament and already beat AGO there, a step away from the playoffs on Kalashnikov Cup. Is that not juicy enough for 4 months? Also, the Cup of Russia is ahead.

In a word, we are fine, but the fact that we are developing makes us stick together. It is clear that we have the potential and we are far from reaching our ceiling. We have a good atmosphere, good conditions, we are gradually evolving — so why would we split up?

Tell me about your team as a whole. Who is the main fragger? Who is a lurker?

My team is good, very comfortable and pleasant to play in. It is evident that everyone here is “necessary” and everyone wants to develop.

kinqie is a kind of rifler and seemingly a dolt but in reality he’s a very hard-working guy. Even not a guy, but a grandfather — each team should have its own grandfather.

Forester — the very same anime master. He will never wake up on time, and waking him up is a whole business on its own. And he is 100% aware that he is the best player on the planet, and everyone around plays like garbage.

Krad — a person who hears all the sounds in the game, even those that didn’t happen. And let’s you know. Does everyone have such a teammate? It also combines a teammate who is trying to ruin the training schedule with his rocking exercises.

speed4k — the stylish one of the team. All there are “Levi”, “Adidas”, “Calvin Kleins” — this is about him. And almost all of the most important clutches belong to him. Sometimes he should aim for the AWP and he simply gets USP and gets people on the character alone.

I … And what am I? I have 3 different mice connected to my computer and I use each one in turn, that’s all you really need to know about me.

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